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The Silver Dawn was launched in austere time and as such, Rolls Royce wanted to offer people a more accessible car, mostly for the buyers who were looking to drive themselves. Most of the Rolls Royce launched by that period were luxury limousines and usually driven by chauffeurs.The car had...
Soon after the release of the Bentley S1 in 1955, six months later to be exact, Bentley Motors Limited started production on a variation of the S1. This new model was known as the 1955 Bentley S1 Continental. The major difference between the S1s and the S1 Continentals were this...
The LG45 Rapide featured much of the engineering found on the Lagonda competition cars which had been so successful at Le Mans, but was fitted with a much more stylish and flamboyant touring body designed by Frank Feeley. Later in his career, Feeley was responsible for the design of the...
This Corvette was a privately funded concept car designed by Bill Mitchell, Pete Brock, and Larry Shinoda. The car featured a fuel injected small-block, lightweight fiberglass body, and the aluminum de Dion rear suspension. The Stingray Racer lived up to its name, and was raced extensively, even winning an SCCA...
For years Buick had used its Super and Roadmaster lines to represent the very finest cars the company had to offer. That all changed for the 1959 model year, with the Super becoming the Electra and the top-of-the-line Roadmaster becoming the Electra 225. The 225 designation represented the car’s overall...
This 1933 Delage D8S Coupe Roadster by de Villars was the 1934 Paris Show Car. It was featured in numerous publications at the time, including the prestigious Vu magazine with images and a statement describing it as ‘triumphant in any concours d’Elegance.’ It was even shown in the Delage catalog...
The Sixty-Eight series was Oldsmobile’s most versatile model for 1947, available as a club coupe, club sedan, sedan, convertible, and station wagon. The Club Sedan proved to be the most popular with 28,488 examples sold. The sedan was also popular with 22,660 finding new homes. Over 73,400 examples were sold...
The Mercedes-Benz 130 (W 23) was presented in March 1934 at the IAMA in Berlin. At the time of the presentation, it was not only the smallest production car, the first rear-engine car and the first four-cylinder model from Daimler-Benz AG, but also the first German rear-engine car to be mass-produced,...
Introduced in 1967, Plymouth’s new mid-size Belvedere GTX was a serious contender in the showroom and on the street, with a fully integrated high-image, high-performance approach similar to Pontiac’s GTO. Tastefully finished with minimal ornamentation, the aggressive yet sophisticated persona of the GTX matched its strong performance. A true “Executive...
Commonly referred to as the A6G/54, it was equipped with a completely revised engine, which now featured twin camshafts and plugs. This engine was directly derived from the Maserati single seater and sports racers and produced a more competitive 150 bhp. Another great help was the availability of much better...
Chevrolet’s early success is often attributed to its durable and rugged four-cylinder engine, and the ‘value priced’ Series 490 models. Compared to the Model T, it offered additional power, more standard equipment, and electric starting and lighting that added to its ease of operation. During the seven-year production lifespan of...
The Ford Capri was designed as the European equivalent of the Ford Mustang. First unveiled to the public in 1969, it was marketed as a cheap, fast and fun two-plus-two coupe, aimed at the blue-collar working man. It was a highly successful model for Ford, remaining in production well into...
Introduced at the 1966 London Motor Show, the Jaguar 420 was a compact sporting saloon in the familiar Jaguar mould. Powered by a 4.2litre straight six, the 420 produced a good 245BHP and proved to be a good handling and powerful saloon of the period. The Airfix model has been...
The Mercury Montclair was a full-size automobile produced by the Mercury Division of the Ford Motor Company from 1955 to 1957. Its appearance followed the concept show car in 1954 called the Mercury XM-800. The vehicle name was introduced in 1955 and applied to Mercury’s premium automobile line. Montclairs featured...
With its towering tail-fins, a copious amount of bright trim, and deluxe luxury features, coupled with a high-performance engine, the 1960 Plymouth Fury convertible represents the best of mid-century space age design. That year was the end of a brief but dramatic period of Virgil Exner’s “Forward Look” of tailfins...
Anyone born after 1960 may find this hard to believe, but there was a time when hardtops like the 1950-1952 Pontiac Catalina were quite exotic. That time, of course, harks back to 1949, when General Motors pioneered the pillarless idea with a trio of low-volume “hardtop convertibles.” “Catalina” was a...
The Crestline Skyliner was one of the top-of-the-line models issued by Ford in 1954, offering buyers a truly unique experience in driving under an acrylic green-tinted front roof section providing an open feel without the intrusive wind....
It’s a great-looking car, and for those who like to be different, it’s a nice departure from the usual offerings from the other big manufacturers of the day. The 1935-36 models were a solid success that deserve credit for advancing the state of the art in “common man” cars....
This is the 1967 BMW-Glas 3000 V8 Fastback prototype, it’s the only one that was ever made. There was hope that BMW would embrace the car as its own luxury coupe however it was sadly to remain a single prototype, with BMW instead developing their own car – the 3.0...
When making its debut in New York in 1955 the 507 left both journalists and the public absolutely spellbound. The long and sleek engine compartment, the cockpit perfectly tailored to the driver and passenger, the short and muscular rear end, stretched side lines and gently sweeping curves gave the car...
Introduced in 1970, the 1800E used the beefed-up B20E engine. With that Bosch D-Jetronic fuel injection system and revised camshaft working in glorious Scandinavian harmony, Volvo wrung 130bhp from its two-litre engine, without sacrificing fuel economy. Top speed was just shy of 120mph and acceleration from 0-60 took 9.5 seconds...
This Pierce-Arrow is a 1932 Model 30 Touring Sedan and powered by a twelve cylinder engine. It has dual side mounted tires, both are enclosed, and a rear trunk for carrying cargo. Only 286 12-cylinder chassis were built in 1932. This car was awarded the Vandeveer Trophy, the preeminent trophy...
The world’s finest personal luxury car without conjecture was the Cadillac Fleetwood Eldorado for 1970, Long, low-slung and unmistakably the “Standard of the World.” Cadillac’s exclusive 8.2 litre 500 cubic inch V8 was introduced for this masterful motorcar. The combination of front-wheel drive, Automatic Level Control, and variable ratio power...
Despite being the second year of an all-new body/chassis, the 1957 Lincoln was extensively updated in order to remain competitive with Cadillac and Imperial, which were both all-new. The Premiere Convertible remained at the top of the order and Lincoln’s most expensive car, at $5,381. Prices jumped a whopping $781...
The Locomobile, produced in Bridgeport, CT, was advertised as the Uncommon Car because it was produced in small numbers, not exceeding 4 cars per day. The fact that only 1,000 Locomobile closed cars were produced in 10 years illustrates the idea of quality instead of quanity. The vehicle is powered...
In 1965, Zagato was considered a top design company, so it is easy to understand why they selected an equally noble chassis to design and build a new body on. This design became the Lamborghini 3500 GTZ, the new body was mounted on a 10 cm shortened chassis taken from...
On 8 June 1948, the first car to bear the Porsche name was road-certified: the Porsche 356/1 Roadster produced in Gmünd (in Carinthia, Austria). The “Gmünd Roadster” was powered by a 1.1-liter air-cooled flat-four engine from Volkswagen. The engine’s power was increased to 35 hp for the 356. The roadster...
Auburn turned the industry on its ear with a new V12 for 1932. Designed by chief engineer George Kublin, it utilized a narrow, 45-degree vee with horizontal valves in the heads, operated by a single camshaft through rockers. It developed 160bhp from 391 cubic inches, more efficient than Packard or...
The Mercedes-Benz 770 was, 90 years ago, the “Grand Mercedes”. It came as the ultimate automobile, setting standards in the automotive field. Two of those are now on display at the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart. The Mercedes-Benz 770 “Grand Mercedes” was, in those times, the most expensive, the largest and...
The Vauxhall Cadet is an automobile produced by Vauxhall from 1930 to 1933. It was an entirely new model announced by Vauxhall on 6 October 1930. The first Vauxhall priced below £300, it was intended to supplement the existing 24 h.p. 20-60 thereafter to be known as the Vauxhall Eighty....
Caravelle made its American debut at the New York Auto Show in December 1959 where 13,000 prospective buyers placed orders for what was billed as “A dream car come true.” However, the first production models wouldn’t reach the buyers’ eager hands until many months later. Renault made no secret of...
Packard’s first post–World War II cars continued the Clipper series introduced during 1941. The ‘senior’ One-Sixty and One-Eighty series were dropped, their places taken by longer-wheelbase Super Clippers and Custom Super Clippers. The most prestigious Packard was the Custom Super Clipper seven-passenger limousine, the car pictured here....
The quintessential pre-war British sports car is the 1936 S.S. Jaguar 100 also known simply as the SS100. These diminutive roadsters have all the hallmarks of a competitive racecar as well as an attractive body built at a high level of craftsmanship. It was also one of the first models...