Your Destination for Classic Collector Vehicles, Muscle Cars, Hot Rods, Street Rods, Vintage Trucks and More.

In the late 1940s and early 1950s, Gene Casaroll, known for the Dual-Ghia and its successor, the Ghia L 6.4, experienced a wave of success. His company, Automobile Shippers, boasted a fleet of over 100 semi-trailers, delivering new cars from factories to dealers who quickly sold them upon arrival. Not...
In 1965, Plymouth unveiled the Satellite, positioned as the flagship model within the mid-size Belvedere lineup. By 1966, it boasted Chrysler’s revered ‘Hemi’ 426ci (7.0-liter) V8 engine, elevating its performance capabilities. Priced at approximately $1,000 above the base model, the ‘Street Hemi’ engine was reputed to deliver 425bhp at 5,000rpm...
Only one example of this car was made! Its design drew inspiration from airplanes at that time.  TASCO (The American Sportscar Company) modified a 1948 Mercury chassis, fitting it with a high-performance V8 engine. The Tasco’s unique design included an enclosed cockpit, reminiscent of a light aircraft, with removable glass...
Chrysler’s ‘Letter Series’ cars epitomize a glorious bygone era of personal luxury vehicles, solidifying Chrysler’s position as a leader in both performance and style. Over a decade, each model was distinguished by an alphabet letter suffix, laying the groundwork for what would evolve into the muscle car genre. The inaugural...
Rolls-Royce’s post-war continuation of rationalization, initiated in the late 1930s, persisted with the introduction of standard bodywork on the Mark VI Bentley. Introduced in 1946, a year ahead of the Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith, the Mark VI shared mechanical similarities with the latter but stood out as the first ‘standard steel’...
Named in tribute to Cooper-Maserati’s victory in the 1966 Mexican Grand Prix, the Mexico made its debut at the 1966 Turin Motor Show, commemorating John Surtees’ triumph in the final round of the 1966 Formula 1 World Championship. Designed by Carrozzeria Vignale, Maserati’s favored coachbuilder of the era, the Mexico...
In response to Chevrolet’s Corvette sports car, the Ford Thunderbird was conceived and made its debut in October 1954, marking one of the earliest models to showcase Ford’s innovative overhead-valve V8 engine. Positioned as a contrast to the overtly sporty Corvette, the Thunderbird emphasized luxury and amenities, targeting a younger,...
With a storied legacy spanning various sizes and setups, the Toyota Land Cruiser has established itself as a stalwart in providing dependable service across the harshest terrains. Drawing inspiration from the iconic Jeep and Land Rover utility vehicles, the Land Cruiser showcased Toyota’s prowess beyond the realm of economical cars....
General Motors’ 1953 catalogs boasted three unique convertible models, each with its own distinctive features. Cadillac’s Eldorado boasted standard chrome wire wheels and a cleverly concealed top that disappeared beneath a body-color metal cover when lowered. On the other hand, the Oldsmobile 98 Fiesta offered every imaginable factory option except...
The Tango T600, narrower than a motorbike, embraces a fully electric propulsion system, offering a promising solution against pollution and enhancing highway efficiency. Designed to fit snugly into specially designated spaces for motorcycles, the Tango T600 not only excels in compactness but also prioritizes safety, speed, and stability. Despite its...
When Ferrari introduced the Testarossa in 1984, it marked the revival of a renowned name from the Italian automaker’s heritage. Serving as a successor to the Berlinetta Boxer, the Testarossa maintained its predecessor’s mid-mounted, 5.0-liter, flat-12 engine, now equipped with four-valve cylinder heads that boosted its power output to 380bhp...
Despite initial struggles in sales of Chevrolet’s new Corvette sports car and the looming threat of its discontinuation, plans for a more focused and purposeful iteration of the Corvette were already underway as early as 1957. It took a dedicated team of engineers, led by Zora Arkus-Duntov, significant effort to...
A surprising departure from Daimler’s renowned lineup of luxurious limousines, the SP250 sports car marked the brand’s swan song before its acquisition by Jaguar. Originally named the ‘Dart’ upon its 1959 debut for the North American market, the SP250 showcased a distinctive design with fiberglass coachwork crafted in-house, sitting atop...
The Hoffmann is undoubtedly one of the weirdest cars ever made. Its design is so unique that it defies comparison to anything else. Sporting a host of peculiarities, including suicide doors, a linear shift pattern, rear-wheel steering, and an air-cooled engine mounted in the rear, the Hoffmann often succumbed to...
Tatra, a Czechoslovakian manufacturer, was renowned for creating sophisticated and cutting-edge luxury cars. In the 1920s, they pioneered the innovative backbone chassis, and in the early 1930s, they achieved another breakthrough by producing the world’s first aerodynamic road car, commonly referred to as the Tatra Type 77 or T77. The...
In 1951, Mercedes-Benz unveiled its premier post-war flagship sedan at the Frankfurt Auto Show, marking a significant moment in automotive history. The debut of the distinguished 300 sedan signaled a resurgence of European luxury, offering both a four-door sedan and a four-door full convertible model. Praised by critics and consumers...
In 1929, Packard made significant updates to its Sixth Series line, introducing a new 320ci engine for the Standard Eight, while reserving the larger and more powerful 384.8ci eight for the prestigious Custom Eight and Deluxe Eight models. The 7th Series, launched in August of the same year, brought incremental...
Introduced in 1954, the Giulietta marked a pivotal moment for Alfa Romeo, embodying the ethos of ‘small car, big performance’ that would define the brand. The overwhelming demand for this model prompted Alfa Romeo to reassess its production strategy, transitioning towards becoming a high-volume manufacturer. A year later, in 1955,...
The 1950s witnessed a flourishing era of Italian coachbuilding, with carrozzerie catering to a diverse clientele, from individuals to major automakers. Among these collaborations, the partnership between Zagato and Alfa Romeo stood out, tracing its roots back to the iconic 6C and 8C sports cars of the 1930s. In the...
The renowned engineer Giulio Alfieri, formerly of Maserati, reengineered the Jalpa P350, building upon the Silhouette’s foundation. Alfieri extended the engine stroke to achieve a 3,485cc capacity, resulting in a power boost to 255bhp. This enhancement propelled the aerodynamically sleek Jalpa to a top speed of approximately 249km/h (155mph). With...
The Mercer Raceabout stands as unequivocal evidence of the United States’ pioneering role in shaping the sports car concept. Originating in 1911, this vehicle epitomized speed and race-winning prowess with its thunderous T-head four-cylinder engine, standard exhaust cutout, and minimalist design catering to a lone driver and a daring passenger....
Giovanni Moretti initially gained recognition for his high-performance motorcycle engines. Post-World War II, he ventured into the realm of compact cars, introducing the first model propelled by his innovative vertical twin-cylinder engine. By the late 1950s, Moretti faced stiff competition from major auto manufacturers, prompting a shift in strategy. Instead...
During the mid-1950s, automotive designer Mario Felice Boano departed from his role at Ghia, a company he had acquired following the founder’s passing in 1944. Collaborating with talents like Giovanni Savonuzzi and occasional partner Virgil Exner, Boano contributed to iconic designs of the era, such as the Fiat Supersonic, Lancia...
Renowned as a top contender for the title of ‘most handsome car of the 1960s’, Maserati’s Ghibli made its debut as a coupe at the Turin Motor Show in November 1966. Designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro at Carrozzeria Ghia and named after the Sahara Desert wind, it rivaled the Ferrari Daytona...
The Packard Eleventh Series V12 epitomizes the essence of American classic automobiles from the early 1930s. In a competitive landscape where leading manufacturers vied for supremacy in the multi-cylinder luxury car market, Packard stood out with its innovative offerings. Amidst the economic stranglehold of the Great Depression, Cadillac, Auburn, Franklin,...
Buick’s lineup in 1954 spanned from the budget-friendly Special to the luxurious Roadmaster, priced between just over $2,000 to slightly above $4,000. Total production reached 444,609 cars. Powering these vehicles was Buick’s innovative V8 engine, introduced in 1953. Available in two variants, it included the 150 horsepower 264 cubic inch...
Auburn cars originated from the efforts of the Eckhart brothers in Auburn, Indiana, creating their first prototype in 1900, though official production started in 1903. Auburns with various engines emerged until the brothers sold the company in 1919. In 1925, Cord oversaw the integration of Lycoming straight-eight engines into existing...
Designed by aeronautical engineer William Stout, the Scarab would ultimately become one of the most influential vehicles of the 20th century as it would become the pioneering foundation of the modern-day minivan. However, it wouldn’t be enough just to call the Stout Scarab the world’s first minivan, although it does...
Debuting on September 12, 1966, the Camaro came in coupe or convertible variants, with approximately 221,000 units sold, a quarter of which were convertibles and three quarters featuring V8 engines. 1969 marked the conclusion of the initial Camaro generation, which had been launched in 1967. Although a revamped Camaro was...
Following the Wall Street Crash of October 1929, the subsequent Depression years dealt a heavy blow to the American automobile industry. Struggling with plummeting sales, Packard responded by introducing a more affordable model, the Model Light Eight, in 1932. Claiming it was a car purchasable from income rather than capital,...
In 1929, Packard revamped its Sixth Series by introducing a new 320ci engine for the Standard Eight, while reserving the larger, more potent 384.8ci eight for the prestigious Custom Eight and Deluxe Eight models. The 7th Series, unveiled in August of that year, brought incremental improvements, including a fresh Detroit...
The 1950s sparked an Italian coachbuilding renaissance, with carrozzerie bustling with activity, catering to diverse clients, from enthusiasts to automakers. Zagato and Alfa Romeo’s longstanding collaboration, dating back to the 1930s, was notable. In the late 1950s, Zagato undertook a special project: rejuvenating a crashed Alfa Romeo Tipo 750 Giulietta...
In 1957, the Automotive Industry Construction Bureau (BKPM) in Warsaw introduced the Smyk, intended as a practical solution for the standard Polish family of parents and two children. Featuring unconventional design elements, such as front-mounted doors swinging away with the steering wheel and control panel, the car showcased innovation. To...
The name Pininfarina has become synonymous with luxurious and stylish Italian sports cars, exemplified by iconic models like the Maserati GranTurismo, Alfa Romeo Spyder, and a prestigious lineup of Ferraris including the 365 GTB/4, Enzo, F40, and Testarossa. In a departure from convention, the Pininfarina X stands out as one...
From 1901 to 1938, Pierce-Arrow established itself as a paragon of automobile quality, mentioned in the same breath as esteemed brands like Packard, Auburn, and Cadillac. However, by 1928, financial constraints plagued the company, despite its reputation and a production capacity of 15,000 cars annually. The formidable T-head six-cylinder engines,...
Debuting in November 1935, the Cord 810 earned a coveted spot in the Museum of Modern Art, becoming an iconic American car. Designed by Gordon Buehrig and conceived as a miniature Duesenberg, its distinctive features included a louvered “coffin” nose, streamlined wings, and concealed gas filler. The hand-cranked headlamps and...
In the early 1950s, Ferrari prioritized manufacturing competition cars, but the 250 Europa marked the brand’s initial foray into limited series production alongside the 375GT America. Unveiled at the 1953 Paris Salon, the Europa shared a long-wheelbase chassis and a 220bhp V12 engine with the 375GT. The Lampredi-designed engine, with...